The Masters – The Final Event

August 21st, 2010  |  Published in Breaking News

The top 16 men from All Events, the total score of 24 games in Singles, Doubles, Trios and Five-person Team,

Masters qualifiers

have qualified for the Masters, the final discipline of these World Championships.

The contest will be the best of five games, high seed against low, for all four rounds as the losers in each stage will be eliminated.

STAGE 1: (For full information, see: www.bowling-wm.de)

Bill O’Neill 2 – Petteri Salonen 3
Chris Barnes 3 – Michael Schmidt 1
Jang Dong-Chul 1 – Osku Palermaa 3
Patrick Allen 3 – Pasi Uotila 0
Du Chang Chao 2 – Cheng Hsing-Chao 3
Ernesto Franco 0 – Wu Hao-Ming 3
Wes Malott 3 – Cho Young-Seon 1
Choi Bok-Eum 3 – Mak Cheuk Yin 1

STAGE 2:
Chris Barnes 3 - Petteri Salonen 2
Patrick Allen 3 – Osku Palermaa 0
Wes Malott 3 – Cheng Hsing-Chao 1
Choi Bok-Eum 3 – Wu Hao-Ming 0

SEMI-FINALS:

Chris Barnes, United States 207-190-180-246-2483– Choi Bok-Eum, Korea 170-216-160-256-232- 2
Patrick Allen, United States 201-212-279 3 – Wes Malott, United States 160-199-221 0

FINAL:

Patrick Allen, United States 188-236-212 0 – Chris Barnes, United States 213-257-289 – 3

Yet another fantastic finale that will be classed as one of the very best ever. In fact, these could be ranked as the best World Championships in the history of the event, and that is going back to 1954.

The semi-final between Chris Barnes and Choi Bok-Eum of Korea had a huge crowd of spectators glued to their seats, the match going down to the tenth frame in the fifth and final game.

Wes Malott truly suffered at the hands of Patrick Allen, torpedoed in just three games, the maestro throwning a final game of 279 to show his superiority.

But the final will never be forgotten, especially the third game when Barnes started with the first ten strikes and a

Barnes jumps for a strike, but leaves the 9-pin (Andy James)

championship closing game of 300 looked very much on the cards. Then a stubborn 9-pin on the eleventh ball spoiled the dream coming true, but a 289 final game cannot be sneezed at, and that

Masters medalists

certainly pleased the crowd.

“Certainly, the Masters title has always been high on my list. I’ve always thought that when I lost to Raymond (Jansson) back in 1995 that I was never going to have a chance at it again. I knew I was going to turn pro at some point and I was devastatedwhen I lost that game as I thought I would never be back in this position again.

“The difference between now and 15 years ago s that I remember how nervous I was and how much drama I had built up about winning this. I remember about the fifth or sixth frame and the crowd going crazy. I looked around this wonderful place and took a moment to enjoy. who knows whether I will be back in three years for the next World Championships. That was a great time to be where I was at that moment.”

Spectator support here at the Dream Bowl Palace, a superb 52-lane Brunswick-equipped center, has been enormous, to say the least. Most of the seats being sold long before the championships began. Press coverage has been great, too, which is unusual in Europe where bowling is seldom considered a sport. Many papers devoted many column inches, especially with features on the center and the sport, which has been great.

Team USA head coach, Rod Ross, was ecstatic, “I’m very proud of all the players and how they conducted themselves. They kept their emotions in check and they never quit fighting.”

Newly-elected USBC president, Darlene Baker commented: “My first month of USBC presidency has been a great success for me. I was in Helsinki for the World Youth and our teams had much success there and coming here with the men’s team has been wonderful. What a way to start.

“I’ve been involved with international bowling since 2004 and have traveled with the teams as much as I could and it is always exciting.

“I didn’t really put a number to my expectations of the medals because I knew they would bowl good, but you never know what might happen because there are a lot of great bowlers in the international field.”

(Photos courtesy Terence Yaw)

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