900 Global Bounty Hunter Pearl

by Bob Johnson 0

52 Hook   15 Length   15.5 Breakpoint Shape

Core Design: The Bounty Hunter Pearl’s strong asymmetric core boasts an RG of 2.53, with a .049 Diff and a .019 mass bias rating. We saw 6.5” of track flare with the 4 and 5” layouts. This core will rev faster and flare more than the original Bounty Hunter Solid’s core.

Coverstock: This red and black pearl reactive utilizes one of 900 Global’s strongest coverstock formulas, S72. The surface is highly polished to insure an easy path through the fronts as well as early midlane. Response time off friction was quick, strong and moderate in oil.

Manufacturer’s Intent: Eric Thomas of 900 Global, offers these observations: “Not only did we go with a pearl shell (S72), we also lowered the RG and raised the differential to provide bowlers with a perfect counterpart to the Bounty Hunter Solid. Bowlers can expect a very clean front with a strong yet controllable finish on the backend.”

Test Results: The Bounty Hunter Pearl handled all medium volumes with ease and even gave some of those who have higher rev rates good looks on heavier oil volumes. Whereas some pearls show signs of squirt in oil, this is not the case for this ball. Even carrydown had limited success in foiling the Bounty Hunter Pearl’s striking ability. Dulling its surface with 2000 or 4000 Abralon gave us the look of the original Bounty Hunter, but with a slightly sharper breakpoint shape. This is by far 900 Global’s strongest hooking pearl to date.

When to Use: Use when a fast-revving, quick-reacting, strong pearl is warranted. This typically will happen on medium or heavier oil concentrations with reasonably clean backends. Higher speed or lower rev players may find more favorable match-ups on lesser amounts of oil than speed-challenged players. High rev rate players with limited ball speed will likely use this powerful pearl only on longer (43’ or more) and/or heavier oil concentrations.

— Joe Cerar Jr.

Bob Johnson

Bob Johnson has received more national writing awards than any other bowling writer — close to 70 over the course of his 40-year career. He began at age 16 as a staff writer and then assistant editor for the weekly Pacific Bowler newspaper in his native California, and within three years was writing feature stories for Bowlers Journal. He has written for the magazine ever since, except for a five-year span when he was hired as the founding editor of another magazine. He moved to Chicago in 2000 and spent 13 years in the Windy City, including five as Bowlers Journal’s Editor. In 1975, Johnson received the Robert E. Kennedy Award as California’s top undergraduate high school journalist. Five years earlier, on the lanes, he had shared the Bantam Division Doubles championship in the Orange County Junior Bowling Association Championships. Today, he continues to work full-time for Bowlers Journal as its Senior Editor, to write his popular “Strikes Me” column, and to edit Luby Publishing Inc.’s weekly business-to-business Cyber Report.